Tara Unverzagt February 1, 2019 No Comments

What’s Holding You Back? – A Reflection on Financial Success

Let’s take a moment to reflect today. What are your financial goals? What are your life goals? Almost always, there is overlap between them, and that overlap usually is happiness. What is happiness for you?

A partner whom you love and who loves you? Children who are happy and healthy, who are able to pursue their goals in life, and who love and are loved?

Enough money to buy and do what you want whenever you want it?

A debt-free life?

Whatever goals you’ve identified for yourself, do you have a realistic action plan to achieve your goals?

(As tempting as they are to imagine, winning the lottery, inheriting money from unknown sources, inventing some unidentified do-hickey that everyone will buy, being discovered somewhere unexpectedly and becoming a movie star probably don’t fit the criteria for a “realistic” action plan.)

Previous articles have offered realistic roadmaps for your success. Have you been able to stick to a plan for budgeting, spending, and saving? Investing, compounding, harvesting your rewards? “Spend less that you make.” “Have a regular savings plan.” “Buy low, sell high.”

On paper, at least, financial planning sounds easy, right? Why are so many people unable to get their financial house in order? There are more answers to that question than can be answered here, but if you still struggle with finances, you may need to start with looking at yourself and identifying some of the bumps on your road to success.

Are you telling yourself money stories that aren’t helping you?

They may involve buying rewards for yourself because “you deserve it” or spending too much money going out on the weekend because “life is short” or “spending time with friends is important.” Both sayings are, no doubt, true, but are there ways to do them honor without spending too much money? Maybe you tell yourself that buying a big, beautiful house is always a good investment. Guess what? Even a house can be just another consumer good that’s draining your bank account.

Sometimes you can’t tell your family and friends that you can’t afford to do what they’re doing. I’ll let you in on a secret: there’s a good chance they can’t afford those things either. They may be going into debt living the life “they deserve” or “they expected.” Don’t follow them down the path.

Take a hard look at what’s important to you.

Does your budget reflect your values and your goals? Or do they reflect the values of the “friends you keep.” Sarah Newcombe, a senior behavioral scientist at Morningstar, Inc., says that comparing ourselves to others is hardwired into our brains. She recommends choosing carefully whom you compare yourself with. If it’s Kim Kardashian and you realize she doesn’t really represent who you want to be, you might want to choose a new role model. A better model might be the quiet, unassuming millionaire next door who doesn’t drive a fancy car but was able to pay his kids’ college tuition without going into debt.

Decide what’s important to you, find a healthy role model who has achieved what you want to achieve, and then compare away. Newcombe says that your odds of being satisfied with your finances and life will increase with a healthy financial role model.

If you need help figuring out what you want from life and your money, contact us at South Bay Financial Partners. We can help you put the pieces of your personal puzzle together to make a beautiful picture that we call our lives. Schedule a FREE consultation with us here >> https://calendly.com/SBFP-Call

Tara Unverzagt January 18, 2019 No Comments

Are You Ready to Start Saving Money?

Saving money doesn’t happen by accident. It doesn’t happen because you want it to happen. Saving money takes some thought, planning, and action on your part. As they say: the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. If aren’t saving and would like to, you need to find a new approach.

Bubble Gum Money vs Savings

Raising my kids, I gave them an allowance at a young age so they could learn about money. You can read more about teaching children financial skills in our article Saving Your Bubble Gum Money. In my house, bubble gum money was money the kids could spend immediately on anything they wanted. (My youngest used it mostly for buying bubble gum when she was under 5 years old.) But they also saved some of their allowances. They couldn’t touch “savings” unless there was something they were “saving” for. In a four-year old’s world “saving for the future” meant they had to wait at least a week before they were allowed to make the planned purchase.

If you see something and buy it, you should be using your bubble gum money. Otherwise, you should put money aside to save up to make important, large purchases that you’ve thought through carefully.

If all your money is bubble gum money, you’ll never accumulate assets that are needed for things like taking a year off work, buying a house, having kids, retiring.

You may not even have enough to pay for a simple vacation. Once you have learned the difference between bubble gum money purchases and planned expenses and transitions, you’ve taken your first step toward financial success.

Never fall in the trap of borrowing in order to “spend less than you make.” Any consumer purchase (furniture, a phone, a car, anything that does not increase in value) should be purchased with money from your savings. Borrowing (payment plans, leasing, etc.) to consume allows you to feel like you’re spending less than you’re making, but you aren’t. The credit card companies, banks, and stores love to convince you that “you can afford this low monthly payment.” Those “low monthly payments” can add up to big debt very quickly. Don’t fall for their trap.

Make Saving a Habit

How much should you save? There is no one answer to this question. It depends on your expenses, your income, your future plans, what’s going on in your life right now, etc. The rule of thumb is 10%-25% of your income should go to savings (and paying down debt). If you’re a single mom making $30,000 living in Los Angeles, CA, you are not likely to be able to save 10%. But save what you can. Save something. Anything. Even $10 weekly is better than nothing.

Saving is a habit. The first step is to integrate the habit into your life. When you get your pay check, put some into your saving account. It doesn’t matter how much–just do it. You can set it up to have it go automatically into savings without any thought.

When you get non-paycheck money, make it a habit to transfer a certain percentage to savings, such as $10 for every $100 you receive. When you get your tax refund, you’ll be in the habit and will put whatever percentage into savings. When you get a bonus at your job, you automatically save a percentage. Better yet, put is all in saving and give yourself some to splurge. Put the $100 in your saving account and give yourself $10 to blow on whatever you want. You weren’t expecting that money anyway.

A habit is a trigger, an action, and a reward. The trigger is “you receive money.” The action is “you put money into savings.” It’s important to have a reward to make the habit stick. You might check your saving account balance and have a happy feeling. You may see how close you are to reaching your goal. You may invest your cash every time you hit $1,000 (another good habit). A simple act like saying “ka-ching” like a cash register adding up the total, can be a reward. Find what works for you.

As you watch your saving account grow, or not, you should be motivated to save more. When you get to the point where the money comes in and the first thing you think is “put my savings away,” you’ve developed the habit. Congratulations!

Make a Savings Plan

There are three levels of savings: emergencies, opportunities, and asset accumulation. Your emergency fund allows you to have money on hand to take care of unexpected or anticipated, but not planned problems. Your opportunity fund allows you to have fun or take advantage of opportunities that come up. And asset accumulation allows your money to pay yourself at some point in the future.

We all find ourselves in a position that an unexpected expense pops up from time to time. Plan for it. If you want to stay away from the high cost of credit cards and pay day lenders, have an emergency fund to fill that need. If you want to have fun and not feel like you’re living paycheck to paycheck, have an opportunity fund. And if you want to one day have a choice to retire or cut back on working full-time, think about accumulating some wealth so you can pay your own paycheck.

If all of this sounds easier said than done, schedule a FREE 15 minute call with us. We are here to help!